mtntops

a bunny makin a pancake!

88floors:

Submerged Churches.
These churches from all over the world are not victims of natural disaster, they all sit in the valley of a reservoir. Many reservoirs were created in valleys with small towns or villages nestled in them, the benefit of having reservoirs always outweighed the cost in relocating a small population. In many of these settlements the religious buildings were the tallest and once the valleys were flooded they could still be seen poking out of the water in a surreal post apocalyptic manner. Lots of them still survive, making more of an appearance every time the water level drops.
Among these examples are Ladybower, Graun, Panta de Sau, Tehri and Potosi
88floors:

Submerged Churches.
These churches from all over the world are not victims of natural disaster, they all sit in the valley of a reservoir. Many reservoirs were created in valleys with small towns or villages nestled in them, the benefit of having reservoirs always outweighed the cost in relocating a small population. In many of these settlements the religious buildings were the tallest and once the valleys were flooded they could still be seen poking out of the water in a surreal post apocalyptic manner. Lots of them still survive, making more of an appearance every time the water level drops.
Among these examples are Ladybower, Graun, Panta de Sau, Tehri and Potosi
88floors:

Submerged Churches.
These churches from all over the world are not victims of natural disaster, they all sit in the valley of a reservoir. Many reservoirs were created in valleys with small towns or villages nestled in them, the benefit of having reservoirs always outweighed the cost in relocating a small population. In many of these settlements the religious buildings were the tallest and once the valleys were flooded they could still be seen poking out of the water in a surreal post apocalyptic manner. Lots of them still survive, making more of an appearance every time the water level drops.
Among these examples are Ladybower, Graun, Panta de Sau, Tehri and Potosi
88floors:

Submerged Churches.
These churches from all over the world are not victims of natural disaster, they all sit in the valley of a reservoir. Many reservoirs were created in valleys with small towns or villages nestled in them, the benefit of having reservoirs always outweighed the cost in relocating a small population. In many of these settlements the religious buildings were the tallest and once the valleys were flooded they could still be seen poking out of the water in a surreal post apocalyptic manner. Lots of them still survive, making more of an appearance every time the water level drops.
Among these examples are Ladybower, Graun, Panta de Sau, Tehri and Potosi
88floors:

Submerged Churches.
These churches from all over the world are not victims of natural disaster, they all sit in the valley of a reservoir. Many reservoirs were created in valleys with small towns or villages nestled in them, the benefit of having reservoirs always outweighed the cost in relocating a small population. In many of these settlements the religious buildings were the tallest and once the valleys were flooded they could still be seen poking out of the water in a surreal post apocalyptic manner. Lots of them still survive, making more of an appearance every time the water level drops.
Among these examples are Ladybower, Graun, Panta de Sau, Tehri and Potosi
88floors:

Submerged Churches.
These churches from all over the world are not victims of natural disaster, they all sit in the valley of a reservoir. Many reservoirs were created in valleys with small towns or villages nestled in them, the benefit of having reservoirs always outweighed the cost in relocating a small population. In many of these settlements the religious buildings were the tallest and once the valleys were flooded they could still be seen poking out of the water in a surreal post apocalyptic manner. Lots of them still survive, making more of an appearance every time the water level drops.
Among these examples are Ladybower, Graun, Panta de Sau, Tehri and Potosi
88floors:

Submerged Churches.
These churches from all over the world are not victims of natural disaster, they all sit in the valley of a reservoir. Many reservoirs were created in valleys with small towns or villages nestled in them, the benefit of having reservoirs always outweighed the cost in relocating a small population. In many of these settlements the religious buildings were the tallest and once the valleys were flooded they could still be seen poking out of the water in a surreal post apocalyptic manner. Lots of them still survive, making more of an appearance every time the water level drops.
Among these examples are Ladybower, Graun, Panta de Sau, Tehri and Potosi
88floors:

Submerged Churches.
These churches from all over the world are not victims of natural disaster, they all sit in the valley of a reservoir. Many reservoirs were created in valleys with small towns or villages nestled in them, the benefit of having reservoirs always outweighed the cost in relocating a small population. In many of these settlements the religious buildings were the tallest and once the valleys were flooded they could still be seen poking out of the water in a surreal post apocalyptic manner. Lots of them still survive, making more of an appearance every time the water level drops.
Among these examples are Ladybower, Graun, Panta de Sau, Tehri and Potosi
88floors:

Submerged Churches.
These churches from all over the world are not victims of natural disaster, they all sit in the valley of a reservoir. Many reservoirs were created in valleys with small towns or villages nestled in them, the benefit of having reservoirs always outweighed the cost in relocating a small population. In many of these settlements the religious buildings were the tallest and once the valleys were flooded they could still be seen poking out of the water in a surreal post apocalyptic manner. Lots of them still survive, making more of an appearance every time the water level drops.
Among these examples are Ladybower, Graun, Panta de Sau, Tehri and Potosi

88floors:

Submerged Churches.

These churches from all over the world are not victims of natural disaster, they all sit in the valley of a reservoir. Many reservoirs were created in valleys with small towns or villages nestled in them, the benefit of having reservoirs always outweighed the cost in relocating a small population. In many of these settlements the religious buildings were the tallest and once the valleys were flooded they could still be seen poking out of the water in a surreal post apocalyptic manner. Lots of them still survive, making more of an appearance every time the water level drops.

Among these examples are Ladybower, Graun, Panta de Sau, Tehri and Potosi

(via robdelaney)

..and when it is August, you can have it August and abundantly so. You can have love, though often it will be mysterious, like the white foam that bubbles up at the top of the bean pot over the red kidneys until you realize foam’s twin is blood.

You can have the skin at the center between a man’s legs, so solid, so doll-like. You can have the life of the mind, glowing occasionally in priestly vestments, never admitting pettiness, never stooping to bribe the sullen guard who’ll tell you all roads narrow at the border. You can speak a foreign language, sometimes, and it can mean something.

You can visit the marker on the grave where your father wept openly. You can’t bring back the dead, but you can have the words forgive and forget hold hands as if they meant to spend a lifetime together. And you can be grateful for makeup, the way it kisses your face, half spice, half amnesia, grateful for Mozart, his many notes racing one another towards joy, for towels sucking up the drops on your clean skin, and for deeper thirsts, for passion fruit, for saliva.

You can have your grandfather sitting on the side of your bed, at least for a while, you can have clouds and letters, the leaping of distances, and Indian food with yellow sauce like sunrise. You can’t count on grace to pick you out of a crowd but here is your friend to teach you how to high jump, how to throw yourself over the bar, backwards, until you learn about love, about sweet surrender, and here are periwinkles, buses that kneel, farms in the mind as real as Africa.

And when adulthood fails you, you can still summon the memory of the black swan on the pond of your childhood, the rye bread with peanut butter and bananas your grandmother gave you while the rest of the family slept. There is the voice you can still summon at will, like your mother’s, it will always whisper, you can’t have it all,
but there is this.

—  Barbara Ras  

(via commovente)

explore-blog:

19th-century Swiss philosopher Henri-Frédéric Amiel on love, a wonderful and timeless read to make anyone who’s ever felt conflicted about love feel less alone.

(via explore-blog)

curiositycounts:

Absolutely captivated by this entire series from photographer Tim Flach, who has taken seven years and an innovative approach to photography to not just shoot, but also truly understand his subject. 
As described in the description for his animal portrait book, More than Human: 
“By taking striking close-up shots of various animals, Tim attempts to demonstrate how close can animal gestures and poses get to those of the humans.
What looks like images of unselfconscious and spontaneous reactions of the animals, is actually a result of long research and observation done by the artist. Every animal responds differently to temperature changes, light, human presence and even sounds – some of them would feel better with the music on, while the other would get intimidated by it.”
via 
curiositycounts:

Absolutely captivated by this entire series from photographer Tim Flach, who has taken seven years and an innovative approach to photography to not just shoot, but also truly understand his subject. 
As described in the description for his animal portrait book, More than Human: 
“By taking striking close-up shots of various animals, Tim attempts to demonstrate how close can animal gestures and poses get to those of the humans.
What looks like images of unselfconscious and spontaneous reactions of the animals, is actually a result of long research and observation done by the artist. Every animal responds differently to temperature changes, light, human presence and even sounds – some of them would feel better with the music on, while the other would get intimidated by it.”
via 
curiositycounts:

Absolutely captivated by this entire series from photographer Tim Flach, who has taken seven years and an innovative approach to photography to not just shoot, but also truly understand his subject. 
As described in the description for his animal portrait book, More than Human: 
“By taking striking close-up shots of various animals, Tim attempts to demonstrate how close can animal gestures and poses get to those of the humans.
What looks like images of unselfconscious and spontaneous reactions of the animals, is actually a result of long research and observation done by the artist. Every animal responds differently to temperature changes, light, human presence and even sounds – some of them would feel better with the music on, while the other would get intimidated by it.”
via 
curiositycounts:

Absolutely captivated by this entire series from photographer Tim Flach, who has taken seven years and an innovative approach to photography to not just shoot, but also truly understand his subject. 
As described in the description for his animal portrait book, More than Human: 
“By taking striking close-up shots of various animals, Tim attempts to demonstrate how close can animal gestures and poses get to those of the humans.
What looks like images of unselfconscious and spontaneous reactions of the animals, is actually a result of long research and observation done by the artist. Every animal responds differently to temperature changes, light, human presence and even sounds – some of them would feel better with the music on, while the other would get intimidated by it.”
via 
curiositycounts:

Absolutely captivated by this entire series from photographer Tim Flach, who has taken seven years and an innovative approach to photography to not just shoot, but also truly understand his subject. 
As described in the description for his animal portrait book, More than Human: 
“By taking striking close-up shots of various animals, Tim attempts to demonstrate how close can animal gestures and poses get to those of the humans.
What looks like images of unselfconscious and spontaneous reactions of the animals, is actually a result of long research and observation done by the artist. Every animal responds differently to temperature changes, light, human presence and even sounds – some of them would feel better with the music on, while the other would get intimidated by it.”
via 
curiositycounts:

Absolutely captivated by this entire series from photographer Tim Flach, who has taken seven years and an innovative approach to photography to not just shoot, but also truly understand his subject. 
As described in the description for his animal portrait book, More than Human: 
“By taking striking close-up shots of various animals, Tim attempts to demonstrate how close can animal gestures and poses get to those of the humans.
What looks like images of unselfconscious and spontaneous reactions of the animals, is actually a result of long research and observation done by the artist. Every animal responds differently to temperature changes, light, human presence and even sounds – some of them would feel better with the music on, while the other would get intimidated by it.”
via 
curiositycounts:

Absolutely captivated by this entire series from photographer Tim Flach, who has taken seven years and an innovative approach to photography to not just shoot, but also truly understand his subject. 
As described in the description for his animal portrait book, More than Human: 
“By taking striking close-up shots of various animals, Tim attempts to demonstrate how close can animal gestures and poses get to those of the humans.
What looks like images of unselfconscious and spontaneous reactions of the animals, is actually a result of long research and observation done by the artist. Every animal responds differently to temperature changes, light, human presence and even sounds – some of them would feel better with the music on, while the other would get intimidated by it.”
via 
curiositycounts:

Absolutely captivated by this entire series from photographer Tim Flach, who has taken seven years and an innovative approach to photography to not just shoot, but also truly understand his subject. 
As described in the description for his animal portrait book, More than Human: 
“By taking striking close-up shots of various animals, Tim attempts to demonstrate how close can animal gestures and poses get to those of the humans.
What looks like images of unselfconscious and spontaneous reactions of the animals, is actually a result of long research and observation done by the artist. Every animal responds differently to temperature changes, light, human presence and even sounds – some of them would feel better with the music on, while the other would get intimidated by it.”
via 

curiositycounts:

Absolutely captivated by this entire series from photographer Tim Flach, who has taken seven years and an innovative approach to photography to not just shoot, but also truly understand his subject. 

As described in the description for his animal portrait book, More than Human

“By taking striking close-up shots of various animals, Tim attempts to demonstrate how close can animal gestures and poses get to those of the humans.

What looks like images of unselfconscious and spontaneous reactions of the animals, is actually a result of long research and observation done by the artist. Every animal responds differently to temperature changes, light, human presence and even sounds – some of them would feel better with the music on, while the other would get intimidated by it.”

via 

hoganhere:

“…and they say my already elephant-loving heart grew three sizes that day…” WOW!

(via robdelaney)

“Remember, you cannot be both young and wise. Young people who pretend to be wise to the ways of the world are mostly just cynics. Cynicism masquerades as wisdom, but it is the farthest thing from it. Because cynics don’t learn anything. Because cynicism is a self-imposed blindness, a rejection of the world because we are afraid it will hurt us or disappoint us. Cynics always say no. But saying ‘yes’ begins things. Saying ‘yes’ is how things grow. Saying ‘yes’ leads to knowledge. ‘Yes’ is for young people. So for as long as you have the strength to, say yes.”
— Stephen Colbert  (via blua)

(via blua)

explore-blog:

Mesmerizing typographic maps of iconic cities by Axis Maps. explore-blog:

Mesmerizing typographic maps of iconic cities by Axis Maps. explore-blog:

Mesmerizing typographic maps of iconic cities by Axis Maps.